That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles??

Shelley and I believe so strongly in our mantra of “no starving artists” that we take it literally when we speak publicly. We feed our audience cookies!

When we started down this path, we spoke with our good friend, Flo – an exceptional baker and home-chef.  She offered to create a prototype cookie for us that would not only taste great but could also operate as an edible business card.

After lots of experimentation, Flo shared her product with us.  We were thrilled with the taste and the look. These cookies screamed the professionalism we were after.

The next step was to figure out the cost to S2 Seminars for all this yummy goodness.  Flo agreed to let us walk her through our maker pricing process to arrive at what she should charge per cookie.

Here are the steps we used for Flo and the cookies.

Step One:  Figure out the material costs to produce a batch of cookies. 

How much were the ingredients and the packaging to produce a dozen final-product cookies?  Taking into account the cookie and icing ingredients, the plastic sleeves and the ribbon, and any spoilage, Flo used her receipts to calculate that 12 finished-product-worthy cookies could be produced for around $9.

Note 1: Flo defined spoilage as cookies where the royal icing surface was not level or flat, the edges were too brown, the bottoms too dark, the icing letters smudged, etc.  She felt roughly 9 in every 12 cookies she produced were acceptable to represent S2. This meant each batch had to contain a minimum of 16 cookies to make sure she got a full dozen of her final product.

Note 2: For those with an accounting bend reading this blog, please know we purposefully kept this story simple. If Flo were going to make and bake full time, then we would definitely need to expand our pricing process to include sunk and operating costs and possibly some amortization too.

Step Two: Figure out the cost of labour required to bake, ice and package a batch of cookies. 

Including shopping and cooking time, Flo estimated the labour was around two hours per dozen worthy cookies.  She did feel her labour estimate would become lower over time once she developed a production system  but for now, this was the number.

In Alberta where we live, minimum wage was $13.60 when she was producing the cookies.  Multiplying two hours times $13.60 gave us $27.20 for the cost of labour.

Step Three:  Figure out the price to charge per cookie.

Now we knew the ingredient and packaging costs and the labour costs.  It was time to do some more math and figure out the price per individual cookie.

Herein lay the crux of the problem.  S2 Seminars had a budget of $1.50 a cookie.  $3.02 per cookie was more than double!  To get the price per cookie to meet our budget, it meant the material costs, labour costs or both needed to shrink.

Flo looked at her material costs and decided that, with our mutual eye to a quality product, there was not much that could be done to get the cost lower.  Next, she determined that meeting the goal of $1.50 per cookie would mean she’d only be able to charge $4.50 per hour until her systems were in place.  This put a lot of pressure on those systems to become ultra efficient so her labour rate could reach the minimum wage per hour target. Her chances of success were extremely low.

We then came to the mutual conclusion.  Although we all loved the finished product, it was cost prohibitive for either of us to pursue further.  We sure had fun finishing up the prototype cookies though!

If you’re a maker and struggling with setting your price, write us and we’ll write back.

Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Grow Exponentially – use both sides of your brain!, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, contact us today.

 

 

A Sweet Business Plan for Success

“Business Plan!”

Did you cringe?

Many people cringe at the mere mention of a business plan, especially if they prefer to live in their right-brain over their left-brain. Of course most of us use both sides of our brains — some appear to use neither side! — but we all resonate more with one side or the other. (See our previous blog, Right-Brain, Left-Brain.)

Business plans live in the left or logical side of our brains. For those who prefer to use right-brain skills, a business plan can seem daunting.

At S2 Seminars, we realized we could help right-brain thinkers if we could find a way to translate some of the business plan “code” into language more suitable to the way they think.

Drumroll please…. enter the S2 Seminars Honeycomb Business Plan Model!

The honeycomb is symbolic of the industrious bee, his propensity to work in teams, yet able to work independently, and his sweet, Return on Investment (ROI), honey! (No, I’m not getting fresh with you!)

The hexagon shapes in honeycombs fit together in a wide variety of configurations which are conducive to building a plan, especially if  you don’t initially know the order your pieces need to be placed or how many you will need.

We recognized that 80% or more of the content in typical business plans is common to all plans. By starting with these common components, you can develop a plan that works for you.  If others who need to see your plan require more components, simply add them on to what you developed for yourself.  (For reasons to have a business plan, see our blog “Because You’re Worth It).”

Here are the most important components of a business plan.

Basics: Your company name, structure, address, phone, web site, social media, your business description and other introductory information.

Vision: Includes vision, mission and value statements. Why are you doing what you are doing and how will you do it?

Products: What are you selling – products, services or both?

Money: How much do you want to make? How much will you charge? What are your financial projections?

Markets: Who is your customer? Where is your customer? How will you reach your customer? How will you bond with your customer?

People: Who is on your team? What skills do you lack? Who can you hire or barter with for the gaps in your skills? Or, do you get training so you can fill the gap yourself?

Summary: The Executive Summary or overview of everything you’re planning. This is written after the rest of your plan but presented to potential business partners and financiers BEFORE the main plan to entice them to read more.

Writing a business plan is the first step in making a living from your art.

S2 Seminars is pleased to offer a two-day workshop for creative and performing artists called A Sweet Business Plan for Success. We will lead you through all these components in detail, helping you ferret out answers to important questions and flesh out a business plan that works for your goals, whether it’s simply to have a roadmap for business success or to secure funding.

At the end of the two days, you will have a business plan that’s 85 to 100% complete, (depending on its complexity, your ability to provide information and who needs to see it) so you can get on with making money from your art.

For more information, check out our events page.

Shelley Goldbeck, 
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Grow Exponentially – use both sides of your brain!, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, contact us today.

 

Creating a Marketing Plan, Part Four: How To Implement your Marketing Plan

This is the fourth in a four-part series on Creating a Marketing Plan for your arts business.

In our previous posts we discussed Who is Your customer? Where is Your Customer? What Matters to or Bonding with your Customer. In this post we look at some ideas for How to Implement your Marketing Plan.

Now that you know who your customer is, where they hang out and what matters to them, you are ready to start marketing.

The good news?  There’s more than way to accomplish this goal. Here are some tips that have worked for us.

  1. Get a system. Create a calendar to regularly put action into your marketing plan. We recommend a simple spreadsheet using MS Excel or Apple’s Numbers. There are apps you can download to integrate your calendar with other functions. Or use Google Plus where you can use the calendar, store and share documents and more. You can even go low-tech and use a paper calendar. It doesn’t matter. Just have a system. And. Use. It. If you schedule web site updates for 3PM Sunday, keep that promise to yourself or reschedule within 24 hours.
  2. Plot out your plan. Research how often you can message your customers without losing their trust. For some it’s daily, others, weekly. You might get away with sending a weekly blog or newsletter (with four times more info as sales copy), (which is tweeted and shared on Facebook automatically); two additional Facebook posts (which are automatically tweeted) and one presentation at a non-profit luncheon where you get to sell your books/CDs. Your research will dictate your frequency. Follow others in your industry. Are you comfortable with their frequency and messaging?
  3. Pre-fill content, wherever and whenever possible. For example, you can write ten blogs one weekend and schedule them to release once a week over the next two and a half months. Prepare content ahead even if you can’t have it generate automatically. You have a system, remember? You can write all your Facebook messages for the month. Collect your images, links, etc. in a file on your favorite device. They’re ready to copy and paste into your posts as you need them. With some preparation your Facebook chores can take only a few minutes each day. Technology can help. Often you can set it up so that when your blog goes live, it notifies your social media of choice. Linking the channels you use is easier than ever and will save time.
  4. Focus. You can’t do it all. Some say it’s better to NOT be on a social media channel if you aren’t active. Pick the top two or three media your audience uses and wow them. If you’re wildly successful and have more resources, you can expand your channels in the future.  If you’re on Facebook, be there. Answer comments. Share information interesting to your tribe. Be frequent and regular. If YouTube is your main channel, do it well.
  5. Measure and test everything. For example, install analytics in your web site so you can see who visited, how long, which pages they clicked on, how long they stayed on the page (were they reading it or just passing through?); all vital information. Test Facebook posts by posting the same message twice, each time with a different title. Which title garnered more likes/views? These are more clues to what resonates with your customer. Test email subject lines by sending the same message to two different groups using two titles. Measure which title elicited more reaction.

We’ve really only scratched the surface of Creating a Marketing Plan but if you implement a few of these tips you will enjoy exponential growth over doing almost nothing!

If you’re serious about making money from your art business, Create a Marketing Plan. If you need help, let us know.

Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Grow Exponentially – use both sides of your brain!, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, contact us today.

 

 

Happy Inspire Your Heart with Art Day!

January 31st is Inspire Your Heart with Art Day, a day to ruminate on how art touches your heart.

Art is many things – it can be a great piece of music performed at the right volume for maximum enjoyment, a painting worth more than a thousand words, prose that moves you to tears or laughter, or maybe even something as simple as a perfectly poured cup of brew with good company to enjoy it.

Do something today that reminds you why you love having art in your life then share it at #InspireYourHeartWithArtDay or leave us a comment below.

Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, attend our workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget.

Playground for Creativity, Community and Collaboration

cSPACE bills itself as a Playground for Creativity, Community and Collaboration.

That is a bold promise.

And very exciting!

As part of our participation in the arts community, the S2 Seminars partners, Susan and Shelley recently visited cSPACE, an incredible building born from the sandstone carcass of the old King Edward School in southwest Calgary.

cSpace is an arts hub, innovative venue and coworking space for Calgary artists to experiment, explore and spark change.

Their mission is to provide the conditions that diverse communities of creatives need to remain vital, sustainable and innovative while generating dividends for Calgarians across the city.

They do that by providing affordable, flexible and inspiring spaces that are responsive to the evolving needs of new artistic practices, missions and enterprises while delivering unique gathering places for all Calgarians.

They provide opportunities for artists to engage with peers and collaborators, amplified through greater connectivity to surrounding neighbourhoods.

They share knowledge by providing specialized workshops, services and peer-to-peer mentorship.

cSPACE King Edward has meeting facilities, a rooftop deck, on-site cafe, and a shared workspace called the Sandbox. This space allows artists to “go to work” which can be vital for artists.  Doing their art is often a solitary activity but coming to the Sandbox alleviates encroaching “hermit-ism”.

Shelley and Susan from S2 Seminars hide in a mural at cSPACE

The day we visited, a market was being held in one of the generously wide hallways of the old school. Artisans offered their lovingly created pieces, from paintings and sculpture to jewelry and soap.

The vision for cSPACE King Edward is to ignite the intersection of art and everyday life. A cool example is the old boilers used to heat the school are mounted in the floor of a hallway, covered with thick glass and turned into a museum piece: art meets life.

Everywhere you go art is in progress or finished art is displayed. It’s tremendously inspiring, knowing this torch has been carried to here and that as a city we have access to this innovative initiative.

We were impressed and amazed. We look forward to conducting some of our training sessions at cSPACE.

If you’re an artist, looking for workspace or a community, check out cSPACE.

Check out upcoming cSPACE events.

Read the cSPACE blog.

Consider becoming a cSPACE member.

Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer,
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, attend our workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget.

Life Happens

At S2 Seminars we believe in planning, attention to detail and doing excellent work.

But the best laid plans can go awry.

We also believe family comes first.

A death in the family has changed our plans.

We reluctantly made the recent decision to postpone our first workshop of 2018.

We’ve rescheduled 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoestring Budget for February 13, 2018.

Perhaps with New Year preparations out of the way, February 13 is a good date for you to join us.

We will help you create a business card and show you how to use it. We will build a Facebook page and you’ll leave with a plan to use it in your marketing mix. We will also help you plan your web site and give you tips for using it effectively.

If you’ve resolved to focus on your art business this year, you don’t want to miss this opportunity.


S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, attend our workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget.

Left – Brain, Right – Brain

The creative side of the human being is housed in the right side of the brain. Logic and reason live on the left-side.

We all have both sides (at least in theory! Some people do leave one to question this!) but we each use the two sides in varying degrees.

Most people tend to favour one side over the other. An accountant will use the left side for most of his thinking. A dancer uses mostly the right.

The accountant might be stumped when asked to come up with new ideas to promote his business. That activity requires the imagination of the right-brain.

The dancer’s eyes might glaze over at the mere whiff of a spreadsheet, which is the domain of the left brain. That doesn’t mean the dancer can do without spreadsheets. (The dancer needs a good accountant!)

Most of us require both left and right-brained thinking in our businesses. The logical thinkers tend to chirp, “I’m not creative!” when right-brain tasks are suggested. The creative thinkers will declare, “I can’t do math!” when tasked with analyzing data.

But we CAN expand our brains. The lefties can learn to let go and loosen up. Their imaginations can be ignited. The righties can be taught to focus on numbers that matter in their businesses and learn skills to make those numbers work for them.

The partners in S2 Seminars know the importance of using both sides of their brains. Shelley has decades of marketing and business experience, which has caused her to exercise both her creative and business senses. As a project management professional (left-brain tasks) and artist (over on the right), Susan knows the challenges of balancing business with creativity.

These right/left brain challenges are why S2 Seminars was born. Shelley and Susan saw a need to teach business skills to artists to help them stop suffering from “starving artist syndrome”.

Join us for one of our workshops.

Shelley Goldbeck, 
www.S2Seminars.ca

S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, attend our workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget.

 

What is My Art Worth, Anyway?

That’s the million dollar question!

Plato was right: beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder.

There are Picassos, that in certain parts of the world, wouldn’t fetch five bucks, yet the experts agree they’re worth millions.

Because somebody, somewhere, is willing to pay that. They want it badly enough.

THAT is the worth of art.

And that’s what makes it so darn hard to price.

At S2 Seminars, we’ve noticed artists either charge nothing or next to nothing. Or they think too much of their own work, price it in the Picasso-range and wonder why they starve!

Finding the sweet spot is the trick.

Here are five basic art pricing tips:

1: Determine your art. What is your art? Define it. How do you categorize it? Is it similar to other art?  (Of course, you’re unique, but find some similarities.) Does it have a genre?

2: Find and follow your peers. Who makes similar art? Who is in their market? Is that your market? Where do they sell their art? Do they sell locally, regionally, nationally or internationally?

3: What do they charge? These similar artists’ prices will be good launching pads for calculating what you should charge for your art. Do you have similar education, years of experience, style, customer, etc? Examine each similarity and difference to find your price.

4: Pick a Price. How much do you need? Let’s say you want to make $40,000 per year to cover your costs, expenses and have a meal out once a month (slightly over the poverty line!) You determine you can charge $2000 for each piece of your art. Therefore, you need to sell 20 pieces per year. That’s just over 1.5 per month. Now you need a plan. How will you sell two pieces per month?

5. Test. Test. Test.  Once you’ve found a price that feels right, test it with your customers. If nothing sells, it’s too high. Think of it like putting your house on the market. The real value of an agent is in pricing your house so you get the most money in as little time possible.

Whether you’re a painter, sculptor, writer, musician or singer, knowing the value of your art is key to making a living from your art business.

Pricing your product is just one of the business skills you’ll learn from S2 Seminars. To check out our latest workshop visit our Events page.

Shelley Goldbeck, 
www.S2Seminars.ca

 

Shelley Goldbeck, DTM is a partner with Susan Cramer in S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills. 

Merry Christmas! Happy Holidays! Happy New Year!

S2 Seminars partners, Shelley and Susan wish everyone a Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and Happy New Year!

We’ll be spending time with family, eating copious amounts of delicious food and contemplating the New Year.

Our wish for you is that you’ll recharge your batteries during this traditional and much-needed winter break.

As you reflect on the past year and look towards 2018, a good resolution is getting serious about your business.

We’re serious about our goal of eradicating poverty in artists.

If you’re serious about eradicating YOUR poverty, consider enrolling in our first class of 2018, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoestring Budget.

Procrastination is the enemy of New Year’s resolutions so we suggest you jump right in.

We’re covering the basics: business cards, Facebook, and web sites. When the workshop is done you’ll have three tools that will make an immediate difference in your business.

What a way to start the New Year!

S2 Partners,

Shelley and Susan

S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills, is a partnership between Shelley Goldbeck and Susan Cramer. To learn more about running your small business, attend our workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget.

Does Sending Christmas Cards to Customers Really Work?

Yes, it does… but the rewards (aka bookings and sales!) only come when you do it right.

Why bother?

Repeat business comes faster when you have relationships with your customers. One of the easiest ways to reinforce or renew relationships is by doing something personal that shows you care about them. Sending a personalized seasonal greeting can do just that. My husband has sent an annual holiday card to his 360+ customers for more than 10 years now. We track how much business results from that effort. Because he’s a renovator and his projects differ in size, the numbers vary but it’s usually 10-20 customers in the $10,000-$60,000 range. Not a bad return for a day of effort and a few hundred dollars.

Who do you send them to?

Ideally, send them to everyone who has ever been a customer. When your customer list is too large and this is unrealistic, then subset your list to just those you feel have the potential to do business with you again or can refer you to a new customer.

Electronic, hand deliver, or traditional mail?

Hand delivery can be very effective. It allows you to guarantee your message is received (you’re face to face with your customer after all!) The size of your customer list, the type of business you are in, and how much time you have will dictate if this option is feasible for you or not. My personal favourite is traditional mail. It’s so rare these days to receive a piece of mail that isn’t a bill to pay or advertising to recycle. Sending a card this way is sure to make you stand out when it’s done right.  Electronic is definitely quick and fast but chances are it’s also the easiest to overlook, delete or ignore.  It can also lack that personal touch that shows you spent time thinking  about this person – especially when it’s a mass email, post, tweet, or other message that the receiver knows went to a pile of people at the same time.

What do you say?

Start by hand signing the card. Having your printer do it takes away from the personal touch we’re after here. (It’s okay to use your computer to help print the envelope labels though.) Add a one-page letter describing something of interest to your customer. For example:

  • Major accomplishments over the last year (wrote  book, cut a new CD, created 3 new works of art – make sure you include a description of where they can buy this new item)
  • New things you tried last year that worked well (changed mediums from canvas to clay, adapted my novel to a screenplay)
  • Trend’s your seeing in your field – especially ones that will result in revenue for you (decreased size of for-business books to 3-4 hour reads, more artists moving to self-sale of their products and services via the Internet)
  • Introduce new people to your team or give a quick update on those already supporting you (“I hired a bookkeeper this past year so I can focus more on my craft.  His name is John Smith and I’m so glad he’s now part of my team.”)
  • What you have planned for the coming year – try to tie it back into the trends you said were coming in the New Year (“I am embracing the trend to sell more of my own art.  Watch for the next release of my website in March-April where you’ll be able to buy my art online at your convenience 24×7, 365 days a year.”)
  • End your letter with an ask to help you find more customers – the worst they can do is ignore your ask!  Let them know you’ve included a business card for them to share with people they know who might be interested in you.  Also include a link for where you want people to contact you online.

Before you seal the envelope, don’t forget to include the business card to go along with your ask!

When do you send them?

Right now!  We’re just a week and a bit away from Christmas.  If you want the card in the hand of your customer before the big day, you’re almost out of time.  For next year, we recommend sending the cards in the first week of December close to the 1st of the month.  This will give your customer time to not only recommend you but also buy something as a gift for someone else they know.

Leave a comment below. We’d love to hear your opinion, especially if this has worked for you in past too.


Susan Cramer is a partner in S2 Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills. To learn more about running your small business, attend our next workshop, 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoe-String Budget

Blogging for Business

Businesses that blog get 70% more leads than businesses that don’t.

I read this in a marketing newsletter a few years ago. It surprised me and maybe that’s why it stuck in my head.

Since then I’ve learned that consistent blogging is useful for building your brand. It makes sense that the more you contact your customers, the more they trust you. Ideally they think of you when they need your product or service.

I put this to the test last spring when I teamed up with two expert gardeners to create a series of workshops on growing food. We were on a shoestring budget so we blogged every other day to start. Then we went to twice a week, then weekly.  It wasn’t too difficult with three of us contributing. (See www.GrowFoodCalgary.com.)

The results were amazing! Within days of launching our blog we shot up to the top of search engine rankings on many important keywords.

Of course blogging wasn’t the only tactic in our strategy but I became a believer in blogging. Now I counsel all entrepreneurs to blog.

5 Reasons to blog:
  1. Blogging is an inexpensive way to have conversations with your customers and potential customers.
  2. Blogging is a personal touchpoint. To build a brand (bond) with your customers, you need many touchpoints. Personal touchpoints like blogs outperform ads.
  3. Blogging helps you position yourself as an expert. Increased credibility leads to trust, which leads to sales.
  4. Blogging boosts Search Engine Optimization (which means people looking for you or what you have to offer can find you by inputting certain words into a search engine.) SEO almost takes care of itself when you blog. Save money on SEO by simply writing good content that is relevant to your audience.
  5. Blogging leads to more income. Better relationships with your customers translates into increased revenue.

Are you convinced to blog yet?

You’ve decided to start blogging, but how?

10 Tips on Blogging Successfully
  1. Brainstorm topics. Create a list on paper or your favourite device of all topics, catchy titles, questions, anything related to you, your art, and the people you’d like to buy your art.
  2. Select a blog provider. There are many. This blog is on WordPress. Choose from dozens of free templates and start almost immediately.
  3. Begin writing your first blog. Choose a topic that you know well from your list. Create an outline: Here’s one way: Grab your audience with a good title, hook them with a great opening, tell them an engaging story, make a  compelling  point, and finish by helping your audience apply it to their lives.
  4. Keep it short. 350 to 500 words is enough. The thought of writing a huge article can be daunting and cause procrastination and paralysis!
  5. Read it out loud. It’s amazing how stilted our written work can become. You’re having a conversation so keep it real.
  6. Edit. Edit. Edit. Edit mercilessly, removing any words that don’t need to be there. Check spelling. Improve grammar. Choose stronger verbs.
  7. Enlist an editor/proofreader. A fresh set of eyes make a difference. (Your spouse or co-worker will do!)  We tend to get wrapped up in our work and we miss errors.
  8. Include a good quality image. Ideally you have your own pictures but accessing free and low cost images is easy. Readers are more likely to read blogs with images.
  9. Do not neglect the details. In WordPress, they provide a TAGS section where you can input keywords. This step is vital for Search Engine Optimization.  A well-written blog will include words and phrases that your audience will use in their searches. (See the tags for this blog below).
  10. Add blogging to your calendar. For example: make an appointment to write your blog outline on Thursday. Flesh it out Friday. Edit Saturday. Share with your editor/proofreader  Sunday. Post Monday. The most effective blogs are consistent. Adding blogging to your calendar helps you be consistent.
Blogging Bonus

Besides creating a stronger bond with your customers, positioning yourself as an expert,  and attracting new customers, here is another bonus to blogging:

If you were to blog weekly, (with two weeks vacation!) in one year, you have 50 chapters in your book!

Some of the best-selling books were born from the author’s weekly blog or email newsletter.

Writing a book is a great way to position yourself as an expert. If you’ve always wanted to write a book, blogging could be the push you need to get going.

Blogging is good business. Are you convinced yet?

 

Shelley Goldbeck is a partner in S2Seminars, Eradicating Poverty in Artists by Teaching Business Skills. 

 

 

 

Registration is Open!

Registration for 3 Must-Have Tools to Market Yourself on a Shoestring Budget on February 13, 2018 is officially live.  If you’ve been waiting to register, now is the time to act while early bird pricing is still in effect.

We had lots of fun (seriously!) using a tool called Ticketor to provide the online registration.  It was relatively easy to set up although it did take a little longer to do than advertised.  The biggest challenge was rewriting some of the “fine print” content they provided with the default site.  Ticketor wrote it as though their site is the only one S2 Seminars has, which is not our case.  On the upside, their videos, FAQs, emails and chat support service were really helpful.

Long story short, it’s now possible to register 24×7 using a credit card.

If you’ve been wondering what to get the artist in your life for Christmas, maybe this is it.  As any thriving artist will tell you, there’s nothing like the gift of independence that comes from controlling how, when,  where and for how much your art is sold.